Listen To Most Current
Grace Notes Archive
June 2021 (2)
May 2021 (5)
April 2021 (4)
March 2021 (5)
February 2021 (4)
January 2021 (5)
December 2020 (4)
November 2020 (4)
October 2020 (5)
September 2020 (4)
August 2020 (5)
July 2020 (21)
June 2020 (29)
May 2020 (28)
April 2020 (31)
March 2020 (5)
February 2020 (4)
January 2020 (5)
December 2019 (5)
November 2019 (3)
October 2019 (5)
September 2019 (4)
August 2019 (5)
July 2019 (4)
June 2019 (5)
May 2019 (4)
April 2019 (4)
March 2019 (4)
February 2019 (6)
January 2019 (4)
December 2018 (4)
November 2018 (5)
October 2018 (4)
September 2018 (4)
August 2018 (4)
July 2018 (3)
June 2018 (4)
May 2018 (4)
April 2018 (4)
March 2018 (4)
February 2018 (5)
January 2018 (4)
December 2017 (4)
November 2017 (5)
October 2017 (4)
September 2017 (5)
August 2017 (4)
July 2017 (4)
June 2017 (5)
May 2017 (4)
April 2017 (5)
March 2017 (3)
February 2017 (4)
January 2017 (3)
December 2016 (5)
November 2016 (4)
October 2016 (4)
September 2016 (5)
August 2016 (3)
July 2016 (4)
June 2016 (5)
May 2016 (4)
April 2016 (5)
March 2016 (4)
February 2016 (4)
January 2016 (5)
December 2015 (4)
November 2015 (4)
October 2015 (3)
September 2015 (4)
August 2015 (5)
July 2015 (5)
June 2015 (4)
May 2015 (5)
April 2015 (2)
March 2015 (4)
February 2015 (4)
January 2015 (5)
December 2014 (4)
November 2014 (5)
October 2014 (4)
September 2014 (4)
August 2014 (4)
July 2014 (5)
June 2014 (4)
May 2014 (5)
April 2014 (4)
March 2014 (4)
February 2014 (4)
January 2014 (5)
December 2013 (4)
November 2013 (5)
October 2013 (4)
September 2013 (4)
August 2013 (5)
July 2013 (4)
June 2013 (3)
May 2013 (5)
April 2013 (4)
March 2013 (4)
February 2013 (5)
January 2013 (4)
December 2012 (4)
November 2012 (5)
October 2012 (4)
September 2012 (4)
August 2012 (5)
July 2012 (4)
June 2012 (4)
May 2012 (5)
April 2012 (4)
March 2012 (5)
February 2012 (4)
January 2012 (4)
December 2011 (5)
November 2011 (4)
October 2011 (4)
September 2011 (5)
August 2011 (4)
July 2011 (4)
June 2011 (5)
May 2011 (4)
April 2011 (5)
March 2011 (4)
February 2011 (4)
January 2011 (5)
December 2010 (4)
November 2010 (4)
October 2010 (4)
September 2010 (5)
August 2010 (4)
July 2010 (6)
June 2010 (4)
May 2010 (4)
April 2010 (4)
March 2010 (5)
February 2010 (4)
January 2010 (5)
December 2009 (5)
November 2009 (3)
October 2009 (6)
September 2009 (3)
August 2009 (5)
July 2009 (4)
June 2009 (4)
May 2009 (5)
April 2009 (4)
March 2009 (4)
February 2009 (4)
January 2009 (5)
December 2008 (4)
November 2008 (5)
October 2008 (4)
September 2008 (5)
August 2008 (4)
July 2008 (3)
June 2008 (4)
May 2008 (5)
April 2008 (4)
March 2008 (5)
February 2008 (1)
Grace Notes

Current Articles | Categories | Search | Syndication

MEDITATION
by Philip Owen

The Word of God forms the foundation of a believer’s life.  God expects believers to give regular attendance to the preaching and teaching of the Word.  In addition, believers are to read the Bible, study it, believe it, and obey it.  The Word also instructs the believer to meditate upon its truths.  Although I have no data to support the supposition, I suspect that of all the foregoing responsibilities, the one most neglected might well be meditation.  The writer of Psalm One describes the righteous person as one whose “delight is in the law of the Lord; and in his law doth he meditate day and night” (v. 2).  To meditate means simply to “ponder.”

We live in a culture that has little time or inclination for pondering or meditating—on anything.  Many people, even Christians, shy away from the quietness of their thoughts, seemingly almost afraid to live without some electronic device occupying their attention.  But the reality is that meditating on Scripture is crucial for the spiritual life of a believer.  For one who fails to meditate on Scripture not only disobeys the Word of God but also robs himself of vital spiritual nourishment that would increase his spiritual growth, and he denies himself the blessings of fellowship with the Lord Jesus Christ.

The meditation enjoined by Scripture shares nothing in common with the meditation practiced by adherents to Buddhism and other eastern mystical sects.  Such meditation involves an attempt to “empty” the mind or the self, a dangerous practice that invites demonic influence if not actual possession.  The meditation encouraged by Scripture is just the opposite of that exercise; instead, it requires a very conscious engagement of the mind to actively consider the meaning and ramifications of some portion of the Word of God.

Meditation may be provoked by study; it certainly may provoke study.  But the terms are not strictly synonymous.  Study is the broader of the two, suggesting the whole array of efforts, especially mental, directed toward understanding the Word, the use of biblical tools such as commentaries, technical considerations of language and grammar, comparing Scripture with Scripture, etc.   Meditation certainly must involve those things to be of any value, but the term emphasizes the aspect of study that entails the mental and spiritual faculties, the rolling of truths around in the heart and mind, so to speak, weighing and considering their significance, waiting on the Spirit of God to illuminate and emphasize the truth, making them “come alive” so that they are more than technical doctrinal facts and cold principles.

When the angel Gabriel announced that Mary would bear the Christ, we read that she “kept all these things, and pondered them in her heart” (Lk. 2:19).  That word is not identical in meaning to the Old Testament word translated meditate, but it conveys the same idea.  Elsewhere the word is translated as “meet,” or “confer.”  It suggests a desire to meet with the Lord, so to speak, to confer with His Spirit, and allow Him to illuminate the truth.  A caveat:  meditation is not a “mystical” exercise; it is always grounded in a literal, grammatical, historical interpretation of the words of the Bible, but it does recognize that the truth of God is “spiritually discerned” (I Cor. 2:14).  Having given Timothy much advice, Paul instructed the young minister to “meditate upon [“revolve” in the mind] these things; give thyself wholly to them; that thy profiting may appear to all” (I Tim. 4:15).  We will never understand all that the Lord would have us know about Him, ourselves, our Christian walk, or the dangers around us, nor will we know the full joy of fellowship with Him if we fail to meditate on His holy, eternal Word.

Actions: E-mail | Permalink

Previous Page | Next Page