Listen To Most Current
Grace Notes Archive
July 2022 (1)
June 2022 (4)
May 2022 (4)
April 2022 (7)
March 2022 (4)
February 2022 (4)
January 2022 (5)
December 2021 (5)
November 2021 (4)
October 2021 (5)
September 2021 (4)
August 2021 (4)
July 2021 (6)
June 2021 (4)
May 2021 (5)
April 2021 (4)
March 2021 (5)
February 2021 (4)
January 2021 (5)
December 2020 (4)
November 2020 (4)
October 2020 (5)
September 2020 (4)
August 2020 (5)
July 2020 (21)
June 2020 (29)
May 2020 (28)
April 2020 (31)
March 2020 (5)
February 2020 (4)
January 2020 (5)
December 2019 (5)
November 2019 (3)
October 2019 (5)
September 2019 (4)
August 2019 (5)
July 2019 (4)
June 2019 (5)
May 2019 (4)
April 2019 (4)
March 2019 (4)
February 2019 (6)
January 2019 (4)
December 2018 (4)
November 2018 (5)
October 2018 (4)
September 2018 (4)
August 2018 (4)
July 2018 (3)
June 2018 (4)
May 2018 (4)
April 2018 (4)
March 2018 (4)
February 2018 (5)
January 2018 (4)
December 2017 (4)
November 2017 (5)
October 2017 (4)
September 2017 (5)
August 2017 (4)
July 2017 (4)
June 2017 (5)
May 2017 (4)
April 2017 (5)
March 2017 (3)
February 2017 (4)
January 2017 (3)
December 2016 (5)
November 2016 (4)
October 2016 (4)
September 2016 (5)
August 2016 (3)
July 2016 (4)
June 2016 (5)
May 2016 (4)
April 2016 (5)
March 2016 (4)
February 2016 (4)
January 2016 (5)
December 2015 (4)
November 2015 (4)
October 2015 (3)
September 2015 (4)
August 2015 (5)
July 2015 (5)
June 2015 (4)
May 2015 (5)
April 2015 (2)
March 2015 (4)
February 2015 (4)
January 2015 (5)
December 2014 (4)
November 2014 (5)
October 2014 (4)
September 2014 (4)
August 2014 (4)
July 2014 (5)
June 2014 (4)
May 2014 (5)
April 2014 (4)
March 2014 (4)
February 2014 (4)
January 2014 (5)
December 2013 (4)
November 2013 (5)
October 2013 (4)
September 2013 (4)
August 2013 (5)
July 2013 (4)
June 2013 (3)
May 2013 (5)
April 2013 (4)
March 2013 (4)
February 2013 (5)
January 2013 (4)
December 2012 (4)
November 2012 (5)
October 2012 (4)
September 2012 (4)
August 2012 (5)
July 2012 (4)
June 2012 (4)
May 2012 (5)
April 2012 (4)
March 2012 (5)
February 2012 (4)
January 2012 (4)
December 2011 (5)
November 2011 (4)
October 2011 (4)
September 2011 (5)
August 2011 (4)
July 2011 (4)
June 2011 (5)
May 2011 (4)
April 2011 (5)
March 2011 (4)
February 2011 (4)
January 2011 (5)
December 2010 (4)
November 2010 (4)
October 2010 (4)
September 2010 (5)
August 2010 (4)
July 2010 (6)
June 2010 (4)
May 2010 (4)
April 2010 (4)
March 2010 (5)
February 2010 (4)
January 2010 (5)
December 2009 (5)
November 2009 (3)
October 2009 (6)
September 2009 (3)
August 2009 (5)
July 2009 (4)
June 2009 (4)
May 2009 (5)
April 2009 (4)
March 2009 (4)
February 2009 (4)
January 2009 (5)
December 2008 (4)
November 2008 (5)
October 2008 (4)
September 2008 (5)
August 2008 (4)
July 2008 (3)
June 2008 (4)
May 2008 (5)
April 2008 (4)
March 2008 (5)
February 2008 (1)
Grace Notes

Current Articles | Categories | Search | Syndication

THE MULTIPLICATION FACTOR
by Philip Owen

             In the salutation found at the beginning of his second epistle Peter writes:  “Grace and peace be multiplied unto you through the knowledge of God, and of Jesus our Lord” (1:2).  All the “spiritual words”—the names or titles of the Father and the Son, grace, peace, and knowledge—are weighty.  But one word, because of its rarity, seems to stand out:  (be) multiplied.  The infinitive, generally meaning “to increase,” appears thirteen times in the New Testament and is translated as abound once, number once, and (be) multiply (ing, ed) the other eleven times, including our text.  Peter’s statement, then seems to be suggesting an almost exponential relationship between the blessings of grace and peace and the knowledge of God and “Jesus our Lord.”

            Knowledge for the sake of God.  It should be the heart’s desire of every believer to know the Lord for His own sake.  It is natural, after all, for a loving couple to want to know all about each other.  Each new fact about his or her life, each new revelation about personality or character brings a fresh sense of wonder and delight.  “Tell me about your life before we met,” they ask each other.  “What are your hopes and aspirations, your goals?”  My wife will never forget one of the first questions I asked her shortly after we met, namely, “What do you think of T. S. Eliot?”  I was immersed in the study of his poetry at the time, and what she thought of him was important to me.  (She eventually married me despite this and many other flaws.)  But the point has been made:  on a natural level we want to know all about those we love for the sake of understanding them better, pleasing them more, and fellowshipping with them more fully.  Who can fathom the infinite privilege of coming to know the Lord at all, not to mention the possibility of increasing in that knowledge?  In reality, it is a privilege afforded only a few, for those who truly know God have always been a remnant, a minority among the vast numbers of human beings alive.  And that the Lord should choose to reveal Himself to you or me should both thrill and humble us.  For no one can come to God, no one can know the Father and the Son, and no one can be saved apart from the calling and drawing of the Spirit of God.  “So then it is not of him that willeth, nor of him that runneth, but of God that sheweth mercy” (Rom. 9:16).  In short, we should want to know Him because nothing and no one is more worthy of being known. 

            Knowledge for our sake.  But knowing God for the sake of God is not the thrust of Peter’s thought in this instance.  Rather, he focuses on the blessing of knowing God for our sake.  Limiting himself to two of the numerous blessings of knowing God, he explains that a genuine, sincere knowledge of God and the Lord Jesus results in “multiplied” grace and peace.  Would we relish the unmerited favor of the Lord upon us and the blessings of deep, abiding peace?  Then we should expand our knowledge of the Lord.  Revealing Himself to us does not advantage God in any way:  all advantage already resides in Him.  But it does advantage us.  Truly nothing of lasting value may be obtained apart from knowing Him, and the more we learn of Him the richer grows our store of grace and peace.  It should be considered enough beyond measure to come to know Him, but that in coming to that knowledge and then increasing in it, we reap vast quantities of grace and peace is an infinite blessing.

            How we obtain that knowledge.  Put briefly, we begin to obtain a personal knowledge of God through salvation.  That knowledge increases as we read and study the Book in which He is set forth.  And the knowledge becomes experiential and personal as we walk in faith and obedience with Him.  “That I may know him” was Paul’s prayer and should be ours.  

Actions: E-mail | Permalink

Previous Page | Next Page