Listen To Most Current
Grace Notes Archive
June 2021 (3)
May 2021 (5)
April 2021 (4)
March 2021 (5)
February 2021 (4)
January 2021 (5)
December 2020 (4)
November 2020 (4)
October 2020 (5)
September 2020 (4)
August 2020 (5)
July 2020 (21)
June 2020 (29)
May 2020 (28)
April 2020 (31)
March 2020 (5)
February 2020 (4)
January 2020 (5)
December 2019 (5)
November 2019 (3)
October 2019 (5)
September 2019 (4)
August 2019 (5)
July 2019 (4)
June 2019 (5)
May 2019 (4)
April 2019 (4)
March 2019 (4)
February 2019 (6)
January 2019 (4)
December 2018 (4)
November 2018 (5)
October 2018 (4)
September 2018 (4)
August 2018 (4)
July 2018 (3)
June 2018 (4)
May 2018 (4)
April 2018 (4)
March 2018 (4)
February 2018 (5)
January 2018 (4)
December 2017 (4)
November 2017 (5)
October 2017 (4)
September 2017 (5)
August 2017 (4)
July 2017 (4)
June 2017 (5)
May 2017 (4)
April 2017 (5)
March 2017 (3)
February 2017 (4)
January 2017 (3)
December 2016 (5)
November 2016 (4)
October 2016 (4)
September 2016 (5)
August 2016 (3)
July 2016 (4)
June 2016 (5)
May 2016 (4)
April 2016 (5)
March 2016 (4)
February 2016 (4)
January 2016 (5)
December 2015 (4)
November 2015 (4)
October 2015 (3)
September 2015 (4)
August 2015 (5)
July 2015 (5)
June 2015 (4)
May 2015 (5)
April 2015 (2)
March 2015 (4)
February 2015 (4)
January 2015 (5)
December 2014 (4)
November 2014 (5)
October 2014 (4)
September 2014 (4)
August 2014 (4)
July 2014 (5)
June 2014 (4)
May 2014 (5)
April 2014 (4)
March 2014 (4)
February 2014 (4)
January 2014 (5)
December 2013 (4)
November 2013 (5)
October 2013 (4)
September 2013 (4)
August 2013 (5)
July 2013 (4)
June 2013 (3)
May 2013 (5)
April 2013 (4)
March 2013 (4)
February 2013 (5)
January 2013 (4)
December 2012 (4)
November 2012 (5)
October 2012 (4)
September 2012 (4)
August 2012 (5)
July 2012 (4)
June 2012 (4)
May 2012 (5)
April 2012 (4)
March 2012 (5)
February 2012 (4)
January 2012 (4)
December 2011 (5)
November 2011 (4)
October 2011 (4)
September 2011 (5)
August 2011 (4)
July 2011 (4)
June 2011 (5)
May 2011 (4)
April 2011 (5)
March 2011 (4)
February 2011 (4)
January 2011 (5)
December 2010 (4)
November 2010 (4)
October 2010 (4)
September 2010 (5)
August 2010 (4)
July 2010 (6)
June 2010 (4)
May 2010 (4)
April 2010 (4)
March 2010 (5)
February 2010 (4)
January 2010 (5)
December 2009 (5)
November 2009 (3)
October 2009 (6)
September 2009 (3)
August 2009 (5)
July 2009 (4)
June 2009 (4)
May 2009 (5)
April 2009 (4)
March 2009 (4)
February 2009 (4)
January 2009 (5)
December 2008 (4)
November 2008 (5)
October 2008 (4)
September 2008 (5)
August 2008 (4)
July 2008 (3)
June 2008 (4)
May 2008 (5)
April 2008 (4)
March 2008 (5)
February 2008 (1)
Grace Notes

Current Articles | Categories | Search | Syndication

GLORIFYING GOD: 13. HAVING THIS END
by Philip Owen

             Glorifying God does not occur automatically in the life of a believer:  it is the fruit of  conscious determination and concentrated diligence.  “Study [“be diligent”] to shew thyself approved unto God,” writes the Apostle Paul in his final epistle (II Tim. 2:15).  Certainly, there is often an unconscious element to the life that glorifies God, a self-forgetfulness that arises from a loving, dedicated heart.  But such love and devotion do not spring spontaneously from nothing. We must yield our wills and submit our desires, if we would glorify God.  And it is to the end that God might be glorified—in everything—that we have been saved.  Peter and Paul give us the big and small of this fact in two succinct verses. 

            Having God’s glory—in things both big and small—as our end glorifies God.  We will begin with Peter, who, it may be surprising to learn, gives us the “big” end of the spectrum.  The objective of the believer, he writes, should be “that God in all things may be glorified through Jesus Christ, to whom be praise and dominion for ever and ever.  Amen” (I Pet. 4:11).  He offers this doxology specifically within the context of the proper utilization of spiritual gifts, particularly those related to formal ministry:  “As every man hath received the gift, even so minister the same one to another, as good stewards of the manifold grace of God.  If any man speak, let him speak as the oracles of God; if any man minister, let him do it as of the ability which God giveth:  that God in all things may be glorified . . . .” (vss. 10, 11).  Peter, to some degree, is certainly speaking to every believer here, but he seems to be emphasizing those aspects of service that we view as more exalted, i.e., those involving the declaration of the Word. We might agree that, in such a realm, we must be careful to glorify the Lord.  But the very fact that the Spirit of God provides us with this reminder testifies to the truth that not all who handle the Word of God—even believers—do so in a way that glorifies God.  How many times is the pulpit used to exalt the pulpiteer?  And how many times is self-aggrandizement the hidden motive behind what is said and done by some who preach and teach the Word of God?  The only justifiable motive and the only just end of all formal ministry is God’s glory.

            If we are surprised that Peter tackled the big end of this subject—formal, public ministry—we might be equally surprised that Paul, the apostle to the Gentiles, the one to whom was committed the gospel of the dispensation of the grace of God, broaches the “small” end of the spectrum.  For he writes:  “Whether therefore ye eat, or drink, or whatsoever ye do, do all to the glory of God” (I Cor. 10:31).   This verse exhorts and exalts me by turn.  In the first place, it is sobering to realize that there is no room for careless or even casual behavior in a believer’s life because God watches and weighs everything  .  We may take a brief break or an occasional vacation from our temporal work, but no such departure is permitted from our spiritual vocation.  Before God, our lives are sacred, set apart to Him, and our smallest activity of eternal consequence.  To affirm that is not to suggest that rest and recreation have no place in a believer’s life but that they must be enjoyed in accord with God’s will.  We are not our own.  We belong to God.  But in the second place, it is thrilling to think that nothing need be wasted in God’s economy.  The world eats and drinks for the energy to continue living or for mere enjoyment.  The believer can and should eat with respect for the body God has given Him and in true thankfulness for what God has provided.  Such actions and attitudes not only glorify God but also bless the believer.  Who could imagine a God so good that such necessary and mundane activities may be done to His eternal glory and the believer’s eternal blessing?  God’s glory is the purpose of all creation and should be the desire and goal of every believer.                

Actions: E-mail | Permalink

Previous Page | Next Page