Listen To Most Current
Grace Notes Archive
August 2022 (2)
July 2022 (5)
June 2022 (4)
May 2022 (4)
April 2022 (7)
March 2022 (4)
February 2022 (4)
January 2022 (5)
December 2021 (5)
November 2021 (4)
October 2021 (5)
September 2021 (4)
August 2021 (4)
July 2021 (6)
June 2021 (4)
May 2021 (5)
April 2021 (4)
March 2021 (5)
February 2021 (4)
January 2021 (5)
December 2020 (4)
November 2020 (4)
October 2020 (5)
September 2020 (4)
August 2020 (5)
July 2020 (21)
June 2020 (29)
May 2020 (28)
April 2020 (31)
March 2020 (5)
February 2020 (4)
January 2020 (5)
December 2019 (5)
November 2019 (3)
October 2019 (5)
September 2019 (4)
August 2019 (5)
July 2019 (4)
June 2019 (5)
May 2019 (4)
April 2019 (4)
March 2019 (4)
February 2019 (6)
January 2019 (4)
December 2018 (4)
November 2018 (5)
October 2018 (4)
September 2018 (4)
August 2018 (4)
July 2018 (3)
June 2018 (4)
May 2018 (4)
April 2018 (4)
March 2018 (4)
February 2018 (5)
January 2018 (4)
December 2017 (4)
November 2017 (5)
October 2017 (4)
September 2017 (5)
August 2017 (4)
July 2017 (4)
June 2017 (5)
May 2017 (4)
April 2017 (5)
March 2017 (3)
February 2017 (4)
January 2017 (3)
December 2016 (5)
November 2016 (4)
October 2016 (4)
September 2016 (5)
August 2016 (3)
July 2016 (4)
June 2016 (5)
May 2016 (4)
April 2016 (5)
March 2016 (4)
February 2016 (4)
January 2016 (5)
December 2015 (4)
November 2015 (4)
October 2015 (3)
September 2015 (4)
August 2015 (5)
July 2015 (5)
June 2015 (4)
May 2015 (5)
April 2015 (2)
March 2015 (4)
February 2015 (4)
January 2015 (5)
December 2014 (4)
November 2014 (5)
October 2014 (4)
September 2014 (4)
August 2014 (4)
July 2014 (5)
June 2014 (4)
May 2014 (5)
April 2014 (4)
March 2014 (4)
February 2014 (4)
January 2014 (5)
December 2013 (4)
November 2013 (5)
October 2013 (4)
September 2013 (4)
August 2013 (5)
July 2013 (4)
June 2013 (3)
May 2013 (5)
April 2013 (4)
March 2013 (4)
February 2013 (5)
January 2013 (4)
December 2012 (4)
November 2012 (5)
October 2012 (4)
September 2012 (4)
August 2012 (5)
July 2012 (4)
June 2012 (4)
May 2012 (5)
April 2012 (4)
March 2012 (5)
February 2012 (4)
January 2012 (4)
December 2011 (5)
November 2011 (4)
October 2011 (4)
September 2011 (5)
August 2011 (4)
July 2011 (4)
June 2011 (5)
May 2011 (4)
April 2011 (5)
March 2011 (4)
February 2011 (4)
January 2011 (5)
December 2010 (4)
November 2010 (4)
October 2010 (4)
September 2010 (5)
August 2010 (4)
July 2010 (6)
June 2010 (4)
May 2010 (4)
April 2010 (4)
March 2010 (5)
February 2010 (4)
January 2010 (5)
December 2009 (5)
November 2009 (3)
October 2009 (6)
September 2009 (3)
August 2009 (5)
July 2009 (4)
June 2009 (4)
May 2009 (5)
April 2009 (4)
March 2009 (4)
February 2009 (4)
January 2009 (5)
December 2008 (4)
November 2008 (5)
October 2008 (4)
September 2008 (5)
August 2008 (4)
July 2008 (3)
June 2008 (4)
May 2008 (5)
April 2008 (4)
March 2008 (5)
February 2008 (1)
Grace Notes

Current Articles | Categories | Search | Syndication

AN EXPERIENCE FIT FOR A KING?
by Philip Owen

            Consider David.  When he was little more than a boy he had slain a bear and a lion in order to protect the sheep that were under his care.  When not much older, he had slain a Philistine giant whose defiance had caused the mighty King Saul and the entire army of Israel to tremble.  Now out of a pious respect for God’s anointed king, David flees from Saul in order to avoid fighting against and possibly killing him.  His escape route leads him to hide with King Achish of Gath.  But when the servants of Achish discover his identity to their king, explaining that a mighty Israelite warrior is in their midst, David succumbs to craven fear.  And in one of the most remarkable exposures in the Bible, David “disguised his sanity before them, and acted insanely in their hands, and scribbled on the doors of the gate, and let saliva run down into his beard” (I Sam. 21:13).  Not surprisingly, Achish reacts with revulsion to the sad display and banishes David from his presence.  Forced to flee again, David “escape[s] to the cave of Adullam” and hides there (I Sam. 22:1). 

            Fear, feigned insanity, hiding in a cave—surely, this is the nadir of David’s life to this point and, were it not for his affair with Bathsheba, would certainly be the most shocking and unexpected incident in his biography.  Already he seems a man utterly spent, not merely past his prime, but altogether beyond any further usefulness to God or his nation, finished before his work is fairly begun. 

            But the next verse in his biography is as remarkable as the ones just cited are shocking.  We might not be surprised to read that “his brothers and all his father’s household . . . went down there to him.”  But without so much as an “and,” we read:  “Everyone who was in distress, and everyone who was in debt, and everyone who was discontented gathered to him; and he became captain over them.  Now there were about four hundred men with him” (22:2).  The cave that seemed to be a tomb where all his potential to be king was buried became the womb from which the power of his mighty men was born.

            How do we account for this?  Naturally speaking, none of it makes sense.  That David’s fear and failure could result directly in the creation of a mighty fighting force that loved and respected him is counterintuitive.  But if we turn to the New Testament, the Apostle Paul provides us with a clear explanation of the entire situation.  “But we have this treasure in earthen vessels, so that the surpassing greatness of the power will be of God and not from ourselves” (II Cor. 4:7).  The explanation of David’s experience is that God is at work accomplishing His mighty purposes through a frail man.  David is God’s instrument, chosen to accomplish His will and to bring glory to Himself.  A naturally strong and courageous David will not fill that bill.  David must be humbled and seen to be humbled if God is to use him in such a way that David will be blessed and that God will be glorified.  Ultimately, it is not the strong and fearless David whom God can use to lead His people but the weak and broken one—one who knows that he must draw his strength and blessing from his Lord and who, consequently, sticks close to Him.

            Perhaps you have experienced some greatly disturbing event in your life, something that has exposed your abject weakness in some way.  It may be that the Lord is at work humbling you in order that He might lift you up and make you useful to Him.  Surely, what has befallen you is not more peculiar or disturbing than what befell David.  Surely, you have the same God.  If sin is involved, confess it.  Regardless, trust Him:  He is at work glorifying Himself. 

Actions: E-mail | Permalink

Previous Page | Next Page