Listen To Most Current
Grace Notes Archive
July 2022 (1)
June 2022 (4)
May 2022 (4)
April 2022 (7)
March 2022 (4)
February 2022 (4)
January 2022 (5)
December 2021 (5)
November 2021 (4)
October 2021 (5)
September 2021 (4)
August 2021 (4)
July 2021 (6)
June 2021 (4)
May 2021 (5)
April 2021 (4)
March 2021 (5)
February 2021 (4)
January 2021 (5)
December 2020 (4)
November 2020 (4)
October 2020 (5)
September 2020 (4)
August 2020 (5)
July 2020 (21)
June 2020 (29)
May 2020 (28)
April 2020 (31)
March 2020 (5)
February 2020 (4)
January 2020 (5)
December 2019 (5)
November 2019 (3)
October 2019 (5)
September 2019 (4)
August 2019 (5)
July 2019 (4)
June 2019 (5)
May 2019 (4)
April 2019 (4)
March 2019 (4)
February 2019 (6)
January 2019 (4)
December 2018 (4)
November 2018 (5)
October 2018 (4)
September 2018 (4)
August 2018 (4)
July 2018 (3)
June 2018 (4)
May 2018 (4)
April 2018 (4)
March 2018 (4)
February 2018 (5)
January 2018 (4)
December 2017 (4)
November 2017 (5)
October 2017 (4)
September 2017 (5)
August 2017 (4)
July 2017 (4)
June 2017 (5)
May 2017 (4)
April 2017 (5)
March 2017 (3)
February 2017 (4)
January 2017 (3)
December 2016 (5)
November 2016 (4)
October 2016 (4)
September 2016 (5)
August 2016 (3)
July 2016 (4)
June 2016 (5)
May 2016 (4)
April 2016 (5)
March 2016 (4)
February 2016 (4)
January 2016 (5)
December 2015 (4)
November 2015 (4)
October 2015 (3)
September 2015 (4)
August 2015 (5)
July 2015 (5)
June 2015 (4)
May 2015 (5)
April 2015 (2)
March 2015 (4)
February 2015 (4)
January 2015 (5)
December 2014 (4)
November 2014 (5)
October 2014 (4)
September 2014 (4)
August 2014 (4)
July 2014 (5)
June 2014 (4)
May 2014 (5)
April 2014 (4)
March 2014 (4)
February 2014 (4)
January 2014 (5)
December 2013 (4)
November 2013 (5)
October 2013 (4)
September 2013 (4)
August 2013 (5)
July 2013 (4)
June 2013 (3)
May 2013 (5)
April 2013 (4)
March 2013 (4)
February 2013 (5)
January 2013 (4)
December 2012 (4)
November 2012 (5)
October 2012 (4)
September 2012 (4)
August 2012 (5)
July 2012 (4)
June 2012 (4)
May 2012 (5)
April 2012 (4)
March 2012 (5)
February 2012 (4)
January 2012 (4)
December 2011 (5)
November 2011 (4)
October 2011 (4)
September 2011 (5)
August 2011 (4)
July 2011 (4)
June 2011 (5)
May 2011 (4)
April 2011 (5)
March 2011 (4)
February 2011 (4)
January 2011 (5)
December 2010 (4)
November 2010 (4)
October 2010 (4)
September 2010 (5)
August 2010 (4)
July 2010 (6)
June 2010 (4)
May 2010 (4)
April 2010 (4)
March 2010 (5)
February 2010 (4)
January 2010 (5)
December 2009 (5)
November 2009 (3)
October 2009 (6)
September 2009 (3)
August 2009 (5)
July 2009 (4)
June 2009 (4)
May 2009 (5)
April 2009 (4)
March 2009 (4)
February 2009 (4)
January 2009 (5)
December 2008 (4)
November 2008 (5)
October 2008 (4)
September 2008 (5)
August 2008 (4)
July 2008 (3)
June 2008 (4)
May 2008 (5)
April 2008 (4)
March 2008 (5)
February 2008 (1)
Grace Notes

Current Articles | Categories | Search | Syndication

TASTE AND SEE
by Philip Owen

             Is there any believer with more than a passing knowledge of Scripture who has not taken comfort in this verse:  “O taste and see that the Lord is good” (Psa. 34:8a)?  In His infinite love and mercy, the Lord has provided us with a plea containing an implied promise in words so brief that almost everyone who has read them even once can instantaneously remember them verbatim.  As this is no accident, should we not take the message of these few words to heart?

            “O.”  The exclamatory word O is not found in the Hebrew and as such has no authority.  But who can doubt that David’s plea as expressed in our translation accurately conveys the heart of God?  Does not the Spirit within us witness to our Father’s earnest desire that we should have the blessed experiential knowledge of His infinite goodness?  Can we imagine that God is lukewarm in giving this invitation?  Can we suppose that He is less than perfectly eager and earnest in His desires for us in this matter?  The very idea that God has such an attitude toward us should evoke an earnest and loving response from us.  He neither slumbers nor sleeps; His eye is always watchful; His ear is ever attentive.  Surely, we must sense the purity and intensity of His love for us in this invitation.

            “Taste and see.”  This is poetic language, verbal metaphors describing experience and perception.  The Lord invites us to wade into the life of faith.  We “taste” when we live by faith (“blessed is the man that trusteth in him” continues the text [34:8b]).  Ours is not to be a life of external religion, of intellectual theory, of steely cold principle.  It is to be the living, breathing experience of walking with the Lord, in the power of His strength, and following His direction.  David tasted and saw when he pulled the five stones out of the brook and ran to meet Goliath.  Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego tasted and saw when they defied the king and were thrown into the fiery furnace.  Peter tasted and saw when He obeyed the Lord, stepped out of the boat, and began walking across the water; the disciples tasted and saw when they began distributing the various portions of the five loaves and two fish.  Stephen tasted and saw when he fell beneath the stones of his angry fellow countrymen.  John tasted and saw when he was exiled to Patmos for the testimony of Jesus Christ.  In each case, their obedient faith brought them an intimate firsthand knowledge of the character and ways of the Lord.  

            “The Lord is good.”  Not all the experiences of a believer are pleasant.  The psalm from which our text comes reminds us later that “Many are the afflictions of the righteous” (v. 19).  How then can we be assured that in tasting and seeing we will discover that “the Lord is good”?  The same verse continues:  “but the Lord delivereth him out of them all.”  When the deliverance involves a complete averting of pain or suffering (as in the avoidance of a car crash), we clearly and immediately see the goodness of the Lord.  When the deliverance involves the lifting of pain or suffering (as in the healing from sickness), we recognize the goodness of the Lord.  But when that deliverance entails ongoing trials (in one sense, Job’s trial never ended because he endured the loss of his ten children for the remainder of his natural life), the goodness may be less visible to the natural eye yet more vivid to spiritual experience.  Who has not discovered in a new way the tenderness of the Lord in the midst of a trial?  Who has not come to appreciate His love more in such circumstances than in the so-called good times?  On such occasions, who has not drawn on a strength, a grace, a peace, a comfort, a joy otherwise unknown?  And who at such times has not been compelled to exclaim with David that “the Lord is good”?  The walk of faith finds fellowship with the Lord to be infinitely precious.  Nothing surpasses such an experience.

Listen to Grace Note

Actions: E-mail | Permalink

Previous Page | Next Page