Listen To Most Current
Grace Notes Archive
June 2021 (3)
May 2021 (5)
April 2021 (4)
March 2021 (5)
February 2021 (4)
January 2021 (5)
December 2020 (4)
November 2020 (4)
October 2020 (5)
September 2020 (4)
August 2020 (5)
July 2020 (21)
June 2020 (29)
May 2020 (28)
April 2020 (31)
March 2020 (5)
February 2020 (4)
January 2020 (5)
December 2019 (5)
November 2019 (3)
October 2019 (5)
September 2019 (4)
August 2019 (5)
July 2019 (4)
June 2019 (5)
May 2019 (4)
April 2019 (4)
March 2019 (4)
February 2019 (6)
January 2019 (4)
December 2018 (4)
November 2018 (5)
October 2018 (4)
September 2018 (4)
August 2018 (4)
July 2018 (3)
June 2018 (4)
May 2018 (4)
April 2018 (4)
March 2018 (4)
February 2018 (5)
January 2018 (4)
December 2017 (4)
November 2017 (5)
October 2017 (4)
September 2017 (5)
August 2017 (4)
July 2017 (4)
June 2017 (5)
May 2017 (4)
April 2017 (5)
March 2017 (3)
February 2017 (4)
January 2017 (3)
December 2016 (5)
November 2016 (4)
October 2016 (4)
September 2016 (5)
August 2016 (3)
July 2016 (4)
June 2016 (5)
May 2016 (4)
April 2016 (5)
March 2016 (4)
February 2016 (4)
January 2016 (5)
December 2015 (4)
November 2015 (4)
October 2015 (3)
September 2015 (4)
August 2015 (5)
July 2015 (5)
June 2015 (4)
May 2015 (5)
April 2015 (2)
March 2015 (4)
February 2015 (4)
January 2015 (5)
December 2014 (4)
November 2014 (5)
October 2014 (4)
September 2014 (4)
August 2014 (4)
July 2014 (5)
June 2014 (4)
May 2014 (5)
April 2014 (4)
March 2014 (4)
February 2014 (4)
January 2014 (5)
December 2013 (4)
November 2013 (5)
October 2013 (4)
September 2013 (4)
August 2013 (5)
July 2013 (4)
June 2013 (3)
May 2013 (5)
April 2013 (4)
March 2013 (4)
February 2013 (5)
January 2013 (4)
December 2012 (4)
November 2012 (5)
October 2012 (4)
September 2012 (4)
August 2012 (5)
July 2012 (4)
June 2012 (4)
May 2012 (5)
April 2012 (4)
March 2012 (5)
February 2012 (4)
January 2012 (4)
December 2011 (5)
November 2011 (4)
October 2011 (4)
September 2011 (5)
August 2011 (4)
July 2011 (4)
June 2011 (5)
May 2011 (4)
April 2011 (5)
March 2011 (4)
February 2011 (4)
January 2011 (5)
December 2010 (4)
November 2010 (4)
October 2010 (4)
September 2010 (5)
August 2010 (4)
July 2010 (6)
June 2010 (4)
May 2010 (4)
April 2010 (4)
March 2010 (5)
February 2010 (4)
January 2010 (5)
December 2009 (5)
November 2009 (3)
October 2009 (6)
September 2009 (3)
August 2009 (5)
July 2009 (4)
June 2009 (4)
May 2009 (5)
April 2009 (4)
March 2009 (4)
February 2009 (4)
January 2009 (5)
December 2008 (4)
November 2008 (5)
October 2008 (4)
September 2008 (5)
August 2008 (4)
July 2008 (3)
June 2008 (4)
May 2008 (5)
April 2008 (4)
March 2008 (5)
February 2008 (1)
Grace Notes

Current Articles | Categories | Search | Syndication

DICTA FROM DAVID
by Philip Owen

 

            The life of David affords many important lessons for us as believers.  May we be instructed by that which the Lord provides for the purpose of our edification.

 

            Near the end of Saul’s reign, David falls prey to fear and flees from Saul to find refuge among Israel’s enemies, the Philistines, who give David one of their cities, Ziklag, as a residence for him, his mighty men, and their families.  While David and his men are away on an errand for the Philistines, the Amalekites burn Ziklag, capture and cart off the wives and children of David and his mighty men, steal their possessions, and burn the city.  Being a man of war, David must feel a strong compulsion to do the obvious thing for a soldier to do and the right thing for any faithful husband and father to do:  pursue the Amalekites in an attempt to recover his family.  And it is at just this juncture, when the natural and right thing seems so obvious, that we learn our first lesson.  “And David enquired of the Lord, saying, Shall I pursue after the troop?  shall I overtake them?” (I Sam. 30:8).  Whether it is the recognition that the plight of his loved ones and those of his men are the result of his sin is not as important as the fact that David does not do the “obvious” thing, the instinctive thing, or the compelling thing.  He seeks the will of the Lord.  The Lord instructs David to pursue the Amalekite army and assures him that he will recover everything.  David obeys the Lord, and all are recovered.

 

            Equally remarkable is the account recorded several chapters later when David learns of Saul’s death.  Once again, the action David should take seems obvious.  Many years before, God had chosen him, David, to be king of Israel and had anointed him king by the hand of the prophet Samuel.  Now that Saul is dead, there would seem to be no impediment to his ascending the throne.  God had authorized him to be king, should he not, in an act of faith and obedience, take over the nation’s throne?  Here we learn the second lesson.  “And it came to pass after this [the deaths of Saul and Jonathan], that David enquired of the Lord, saying, Shall I go up into any of the cities of Judah?  And the Lord said unto him, Go up.  And David said, Whither shall I go up?  And he said, Unto Hebron” (II Sam. 2:1).  He seeks the will of the Lord.  Though God had long before made His will known to David regarding his kingship, when the opportunity presents itself, David does not seize it.  He seeks and confirms the will of the Lord.  The Lord tells him to go up to Hebron (not Jerusalem, the capitol city); David does so and reigns there.   

 

In the next chapter we read that “there was long war between the house of Saul and the house of David:  but David waxed stronger and stronger, and the house of Saul waxed weaker and weaker” (II Sam. 3:1).  Finally, after some seven-and-a-half years, David ascends his rightful throne in the capitol city of Jerusalem.  Though he is king according to the will of God, he does not automatically ascend the throne. And here we learn our third lesson.  He must fight and defeat enemies in order to fulfill God’s will.  The fact that we are seeking and even doing God’s will does not mean that we will not encounter opposition—both in our own hearts and minds and in those around us.  Seldom do natural or spiritual victories come automatically; they result from a believing heart (that is faith) that enables our hands to fight (that is obedience).  Failing to seek God’s will constitutes a rejection of the first two lessons that God would have us to learn regarding faith.  Failing to do God’s will constitutes a rebellion against the third lesson that God would have us learn regarding obedience.  David was a man after God’s own heart, not because he was perfect, but because he constantly sought the Lord in faith and then did what the Lord instructed him to do.  May we learn these lessons ourselves.

Actions: E-mail | Permalink

Previous Page | Next Page