Listen To Most Current
Grace Notes Archive
June 2021 (3)
May 2021 (5)
April 2021 (4)
March 2021 (5)
February 2021 (4)
January 2021 (5)
December 2020 (4)
November 2020 (4)
October 2020 (5)
September 2020 (4)
August 2020 (5)
July 2020 (21)
June 2020 (29)
May 2020 (28)
April 2020 (31)
March 2020 (5)
February 2020 (4)
January 2020 (5)
December 2019 (5)
November 2019 (3)
October 2019 (5)
September 2019 (4)
August 2019 (5)
July 2019 (4)
June 2019 (5)
May 2019 (4)
April 2019 (4)
March 2019 (4)
February 2019 (6)
January 2019 (4)
December 2018 (4)
November 2018 (5)
October 2018 (4)
September 2018 (4)
August 2018 (4)
July 2018 (3)
June 2018 (4)
May 2018 (4)
April 2018 (4)
March 2018 (4)
February 2018 (5)
January 2018 (4)
December 2017 (4)
November 2017 (5)
October 2017 (4)
September 2017 (5)
August 2017 (4)
July 2017 (4)
June 2017 (5)
May 2017 (4)
April 2017 (5)
March 2017 (3)
February 2017 (4)
January 2017 (3)
December 2016 (5)
November 2016 (4)
October 2016 (4)
September 2016 (5)
August 2016 (3)
July 2016 (4)
June 2016 (5)
May 2016 (4)
April 2016 (5)
March 2016 (4)
February 2016 (4)
January 2016 (5)
December 2015 (4)
November 2015 (4)
October 2015 (3)
September 2015 (4)
August 2015 (5)
July 2015 (5)
June 2015 (4)
May 2015 (5)
April 2015 (2)
March 2015 (4)
February 2015 (4)
January 2015 (5)
December 2014 (4)
November 2014 (5)
October 2014 (4)
September 2014 (4)
August 2014 (4)
July 2014 (5)
June 2014 (4)
May 2014 (5)
April 2014 (4)
March 2014 (4)
February 2014 (4)
January 2014 (5)
December 2013 (4)
November 2013 (5)
October 2013 (4)
September 2013 (4)
August 2013 (5)
July 2013 (4)
June 2013 (3)
May 2013 (5)
April 2013 (4)
March 2013 (4)
February 2013 (5)
January 2013 (4)
December 2012 (4)
November 2012 (5)
October 2012 (4)
September 2012 (4)
August 2012 (5)
July 2012 (4)
June 2012 (4)
May 2012 (5)
April 2012 (4)
March 2012 (5)
February 2012 (4)
January 2012 (4)
December 2011 (5)
November 2011 (4)
October 2011 (4)
September 2011 (5)
August 2011 (4)
July 2011 (4)
June 2011 (5)
May 2011 (4)
April 2011 (5)
March 2011 (4)
February 2011 (4)
January 2011 (5)
December 2010 (4)
November 2010 (4)
October 2010 (4)
September 2010 (5)
August 2010 (4)
July 2010 (6)
June 2010 (4)
May 2010 (4)
April 2010 (4)
March 2010 (5)
February 2010 (4)
January 2010 (5)
December 2009 (5)
November 2009 (3)
October 2009 (6)
September 2009 (3)
August 2009 (5)
July 2009 (4)
June 2009 (4)
May 2009 (5)
April 2009 (4)
March 2009 (4)
February 2009 (4)
January 2009 (5)
December 2008 (4)
November 2008 (5)
October 2008 (4)
September 2008 (5)
August 2008 (4)
July 2008 (3)
June 2008 (4)
May 2008 (5)
April 2008 (4)
March 2008 (5)
February 2008 (1)
Grace Notes

Current Articles | Categories | Search | Syndication

SLEEPING IN YOUR OWN HOUSE
by Philip Owen

            We have become so enamored of and dependent upon our modern conveniences and creature comforts that in many cases, rather than freeing up our lives, they have enslaved us.  For example, how many of us have not fallen prey to some measure of alarm upon realizing that we have left the house without our cell phone—a device that some twenty-five years ago was not even available to the general public?  How did mankind manage to survive for six millennia without it?  Sarcasm notwithstanding, if most of us are honest, we will acknowledge that many of the decisions we make are dictated by nothing more substantial than how they will affect our comfort.  The practical reality of many of our lives is that we more closely emulate the motto of the fool’s “eat, drink, and be merry” than of the Lord’s admonition to resist laying up treasure for ourselves but to be “rich toward God” (Lk. 12:16-21).

 

            Our tendency is almost to dismiss as hyperbole Paul’s admonition that “having food and raiment let us be therewith content” (I Tim. 6:8).  But John’s gospel provides a remarkable vignette of the Lord Jesus exemplifying this attitude.  Following an extended discourse during the Feast of Tabernacles, we read that “every man went unto his own house” (7:53).  That seems an altogether normal and fitting thing to do at the end of the day.  But the verse that follows says this:  “Jesus went unto the mount of Olives” (8:1).  The next verse indicates that this was not merely the scenic route home:  “And early in the morning he came again into the temple, and all the people came unto him; and he sat down, and taught them” (8:2).

 

            The contrast is stark. They had all returned to their homes for a warm evening meal and a comfortable night’s sleep in their own homes.  They had all arisen refreshed and had come to the temple fortified with a wholesome breakfast.  Our Lord apparently had spent the entire night on the Mount of Olives, alone, without meals, without shelter, without a pillow for his head, a mat to lie on, or any cover for comfort.  And to any who might point to textual questions about this passage, we would point to Luke’s gospel:  “And in the day time he was teaching in the temple; and at night he went out, and abode in the mount that is called the mount of Olives.  And all the people came early in the morning to him in the temple, for to hear him” (21:37, 38).

 

            To those who would point to the more primitive conditions of that age, I would only say that it has never been normal, much less pleasant, for humans to go for extended periods of time with little food and no shelter.  The reality is that the Lord was dependent upon strangers for these basic necessities:  “Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nests; but the Son of man hath not where to lay his head” (Lk. 9:58).  And the truth is that He willingly became poor for our sakes that we might receive His eternal riches.

 

            The Bible does not suggest that we should seek to be martyrs, try to live monastic lives, or deliberately try to live in poverty and squalor.  But it is clear that our Lord lived a life of conscious self-denial.  And in the same chapter in which He declared Himself to have no home, He also declared:  “If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross daily, and follow me.  For whosoever will save his life shall lose it:  but whosoever will lose his life for my sake shall save it” (Lk. 9:23, 24).  Self-denial is not a call to deliberately do without.  After all, it is the Lord’s responsibility ultimately to provide for us.  But it is a call to make decisions and choices for the glory of the Lord and the blessing of others rather than for our own advantage and according to our own desires.  Nothing less befits the redeemed.

Actions: E-mail | Permalink

Previous Page | Next Page