Listen To Most Current
Grace Notes Archive
October 2021 (3)
September 2021 (4)
August 2021 (4)
July 2021 (6)
June 2021 (4)
May 2021 (5)
April 2021 (4)
March 2021 (5)
February 2021 (4)
January 2021 (5)
December 2020 (4)
November 2020 (4)
October 2020 (5)
September 2020 (4)
August 2020 (5)
July 2020 (21)
June 2020 (29)
May 2020 (28)
April 2020 (31)
March 2020 (5)
February 2020 (4)
January 2020 (5)
December 2019 (5)
November 2019 (3)
October 2019 (5)
September 2019 (4)
August 2019 (5)
July 2019 (4)
June 2019 (5)
May 2019 (4)
April 2019 (4)
March 2019 (4)
February 2019 (6)
January 2019 (4)
December 2018 (4)
November 2018 (5)
October 2018 (4)
September 2018 (4)
August 2018 (4)
July 2018 (3)
June 2018 (4)
May 2018 (4)
April 2018 (4)
March 2018 (4)
February 2018 (5)
January 2018 (4)
December 2017 (4)
November 2017 (5)
October 2017 (4)
September 2017 (5)
August 2017 (4)
July 2017 (4)
June 2017 (5)
May 2017 (4)
April 2017 (5)
March 2017 (3)
February 2017 (4)
January 2017 (3)
December 2016 (5)
November 2016 (4)
October 2016 (4)
September 2016 (5)
August 2016 (3)
July 2016 (4)
June 2016 (5)
May 2016 (4)
April 2016 (5)
March 2016 (4)
February 2016 (4)
January 2016 (5)
December 2015 (4)
November 2015 (4)
October 2015 (3)
September 2015 (4)
August 2015 (5)
July 2015 (5)
June 2015 (4)
May 2015 (5)
April 2015 (2)
March 2015 (4)
February 2015 (4)
January 2015 (5)
December 2014 (4)
November 2014 (5)
October 2014 (4)
September 2014 (4)
August 2014 (4)
July 2014 (5)
June 2014 (4)
May 2014 (5)
April 2014 (4)
March 2014 (4)
February 2014 (4)
January 2014 (5)
December 2013 (4)
November 2013 (5)
October 2013 (4)
September 2013 (4)
August 2013 (5)
July 2013 (4)
June 2013 (3)
May 2013 (5)
April 2013 (4)
March 2013 (4)
February 2013 (5)
January 2013 (4)
December 2012 (4)
November 2012 (5)
October 2012 (4)
September 2012 (4)
August 2012 (5)
July 2012 (4)
June 2012 (4)
May 2012 (5)
April 2012 (4)
March 2012 (5)
February 2012 (4)
January 2012 (4)
December 2011 (5)
November 2011 (4)
October 2011 (4)
September 2011 (5)
August 2011 (4)
July 2011 (4)
June 2011 (5)
May 2011 (4)
April 2011 (5)
March 2011 (4)
February 2011 (4)
January 2011 (5)
December 2010 (4)
November 2010 (4)
October 2010 (4)
September 2010 (5)
August 2010 (4)
July 2010 (6)
June 2010 (4)
May 2010 (4)
April 2010 (4)
March 2010 (5)
February 2010 (4)
January 2010 (5)
December 2009 (5)
November 2009 (3)
October 2009 (6)
September 2009 (3)
August 2009 (5)
July 2009 (4)
June 2009 (4)
May 2009 (5)
April 2009 (4)
March 2009 (4)
February 2009 (4)
January 2009 (5)
December 2008 (4)
November 2008 (5)
October 2008 (4)
September 2008 (5)
August 2008 (4)
July 2008 (3)
June 2008 (4)
May 2008 (5)
April 2008 (4)
March 2008 (5)
February 2008 (1)
Grace Notes

Current Articles | Categories | Search | Syndication

OUR PASSIONS ARE CONTAGIOUS
by Philip Owen

           Some time ago, I read a devotional by Milton Vincent in which he made an arresting comment. Writing to fathers in particular, he said, “Your passions are the most contagious thing about you.” That may not be absolutely and always true in the same way that 2+2=4. After all, some passions may be the most repulsive thing about a person. Many a child has come to hate some parental passion because the child’s interests were so divergent from those of the parent that the parent’s insistence that the child share his or her passion turned the child completely off. But it is certainly true that children tend to “catch” the things their parents are passionate about. How many little boys grow up loving the Chicago Bears because that was their fathers’ favorite football team, or loving Chevrolets for no other reason than that Chevrolet was their fathers’ favorite make of car? I wanted a Scofield Bible when I was a boy. Because my father was passionate about the Scofield Bible, I became passionate about it. It took two years of saving every penny I received to afford one, but one of the happiest days of my young life occurred when I was able to march into the Christian bookstore and plunk down cash to buy a Bible like my dad’s.

           We often don’t realize what we are passionate about until we see that passion manifested in our children. Sometimes the revelation is heartwarming and encouraging. But sometimes it is sad and shocking. COVID-19 served as a stark reminder that we tend to spread our contagion to those we are closest to. We wore masks and practiced social distancing in order to avoid infecting those we loved. We took precautions, inconvenienced ourselves—even when we weren’t convinced it was necessary—in order to protect the health of those we loved.

           Sadly, many of us carry a contagion far worse than COVID-19—passions that when contracted by our children will result in their spiritual death. Yet we won’t inconvenience ourselves to protect others and wind up infecting our children with a passion for sports, or social media. Our children contract from us the disease of needing to be popular or fashionable. And those illnesses choke out other healthy things, like love for the Lord and His Word, a healthy prayer life, genuine love for and fellowship with other believers. We wonder why our children are so worldly, so rebellious, so selfish. We wonder why they have no interest in church, no relationship with other Christians, no interest in God. And we fail to see that they have succumbed to our passions. But the disease that didn’t succeed in talking our life is powerful and more destructive in their young bodies. It takes hold quickly and viciously begins squeezing the life out of them.

           Isn’t it significant that in both the Old and New Testaments David is described as a man after God’s own heart (I Sam. 13:14; Acts 13:22)? David was far from being a perfect man, but the passions of His Heavenly Father were David’s passions. The interests of God were David’s interests. God’s will was David’s will. The apostle Paul quotes God as explaining that being a man after His own heart meant that David would “do all My will” (Acts. 13:22b). David had caught God’s passion.

           What about us? Are our children and those we influence spiritually lethargic? Do we find them indifferent, unresponsive, even antagonistic toward the truths of God? Perhaps they caught that disease from us? Perhaps they never developed a taste for the Lord because He was absent from our table. As a little boy I had no appetite and liked almost nothing nourishing except fresh fruit. But my mother put good food on the table at every meal and my father insisted that I eat a small portion of everything—every time. Eventually, I came to really enjoy a great variety of foods that were good for me. We can’t manufacture passion in ourselves—much less in others. But what we are passionate about will be manifest—often most clearly in our children. May we determine to eat daily at least a little portion of what is good for us that we might develop a taste for God’s nutritious truth and pass that passion for the Lord, His Word, and true righteousness on to our children and others we may influence.

Actions: E-mail | Permalink

Previous Page | Next Page