Listen To Most Current
Grace Notes Archive
November 2021 (4)
October 2021 (5)
September 2021 (4)
August 2021 (4)
July 2021 (6)
June 2021 (4)
May 2021 (5)
April 2021 (4)
March 2021 (5)
February 2021 (4)
January 2021 (5)
December 2020 (4)
November 2020 (4)
October 2020 (5)
September 2020 (4)
August 2020 (5)
July 2020 (21)
June 2020 (29)
May 2020 (28)
April 2020 (31)
March 2020 (5)
February 2020 (4)
January 2020 (5)
December 2019 (5)
November 2019 (3)
October 2019 (5)
September 2019 (4)
August 2019 (5)
July 2019 (4)
June 2019 (5)
May 2019 (4)
April 2019 (4)
March 2019 (4)
February 2019 (6)
January 2019 (4)
December 2018 (4)
November 2018 (5)
October 2018 (4)
September 2018 (4)
August 2018 (4)
July 2018 (3)
June 2018 (4)
May 2018 (4)
April 2018 (4)
March 2018 (4)
February 2018 (5)
January 2018 (4)
December 2017 (4)
November 2017 (5)
October 2017 (4)
September 2017 (5)
August 2017 (4)
July 2017 (4)
June 2017 (5)
May 2017 (4)
April 2017 (5)
March 2017 (3)
February 2017 (4)
January 2017 (3)
December 2016 (5)
November 2016 (4)
October 2016 (4)
September 2016 (5)
August 2016 (3)
July 2016 (4)
June 2016 (5)
May 2016 (4)
April 2016 (5)
March 2016 (4)
February 2016 (4)
January 2016 (5)
December 2015 (4)
November 2015 (4)
October 2015 (3)
September 2015 (4)
August 2015 (5)
July 2015 (5)
June 2015 (4)
May 2015 (5)
April 2015 (2)
March 2015 (4)
February 2015 (4)
January 2015 (5)
December 2014 (4)
November 2014 (5)
October 2014 (4)
September 2014 (4)
August 2014 (4)
July 2014 (5)
June 2014 (4)
May 2014 (5)
April 2014 (4)
March 2014 (4)
February 2014 (4)
January 2014 (5)
December 2013 (4)
November 2013 (5)
October 2013 (4)
September 2013 (4)
August 2013 (5)
July 2013 (4)
June 2013 (3)
May 2013 (5)
April 2013 (4)
March 2013 (4)
February 2013 (5)
January 2013 (4)
December 2012 (4)
November 2012 (5)
October 2012 (4)
September 2012 (4)
August 2012 (5)
July 2012 (4)
June 2012 (4)
May 2012 (5)
April 2012 (4)
March 2012 (5)
February 2012 (4)
January 2012 (4)
December 2011 (5)
November 2011 (4)
October 2011 (4)
September 2011 (5)
August 2011 (4)
July 2011 (4)
June 2011 (5)
May 2011 (4)
April 2011 (5)
March 2011 (4)
February 2011 (4)
January 2011 (5)
December 2010 (4)
November 2010 (4)
October 2010 (4)
September 2010 (5)
August 2010 (4)
July 2010 (6)
June 2010 (4)
May 2010 (4)
April 2010 (4)
March 2010 (5)
February 2010 (4)
January 2010 (5)
December 2009 (5)
November 2009 (3)
October 2009 (6)
September 2009 (3)
August 2009 (5)
July 2009 (4)
June 2009 (4)
May 2009 (5)
April 2009 (4)
March 2009 (4)
February 2009 (4)
January 2009 (5)
December 2008 (4)
November 2008 (5)
October 2008 (4)
September 2008 (5)
August 2008 (4)
July 2008 (3)
June 2008 (4)
May 2008 (5)
April 2008 (4)
March 2008 (5)
February 2008 (1)
Grace Notes

Current Articles | Categories | Search | Syndication

WHAT THE HORNETS TEACH US
by Philip Owen

          So your life was pretty ordinary today? God did not descend in a fiery or cloudy pillar and speak to you. No angel descended and spoke to you as one did, for instance, to Manoah, Gideon, Zacharias, and Mary. No sea parted in front of you. When you used the last of your flour, it really was the last of your flour. You had to go to the grocery store and buy another five-pound bag. Your life was so ordinary, in fact, that you failed to see God’s providence actively working in every mundane detail. That’s a mistake because God is acting as immediately, deliberately, and personally in the routine circumstances of a believer’s life as He did when He intervened with a miracle.

            Just because God does not announce His presence, explain why you had a flat tire today, your boss yelled at you, or your electricity and plumbing worked without a hitch is no excuse for failing to recognize the hand of God ordering the details of your life. God is as intimately involved in your safe drive to work or the good operation of your vacuum cleaner as He was in turning the water into wine or feeding five thousand with five loaves of bread and two fish. In this dispensation, miracles are not the evidence of God’s blessing or the proof of His presence. And failure to recognize God’s sovereign providence in the mundane affairs of life both dishonors the Lord and debilitates the believer.

            Since He is fully in charge of something as commonplace as the flight of an insect, God wanted His people to recognize His work in their lives when it wasn’t immediately evident. So on two occasions He prophesied that He would act to deliver them by means that might seem unusual but altogether natural. Following the giving of the law on Mt. Sinai, He promised to “send hornets ahead of you so that they will drive out the Hivites, the Canaanites, and the Hittites before you” (Ex. 23:28). That was at the beginning of their lengthy wandering in the wilderness. Forty years later, just before Israel entered the Promised Land, God reiterated His promise: “Moreover, the Lord your God will send the hornet against them, until those who are left and hide themselves from you perish” (Deut. 7:20). Interestingly, the Spirit of God did not see fit to record a firsthand account of the Lord using hornets to defeat Israel’s enemies, but in his retrospective on Israel’s history, Joshua reminds the people after the event that God “sent the hornet before you and it drove out the two kings of the Amorites from before you, but not by your sword or your bow” (Josh. 24:12).

            God was reminding them and us that He is Lord of the hornets, just as He is Lord of the trees, of the gentle breezes and gale force winds. He is Lord of the dust and Lord of the oceans, just as He is Lord of COVID-19 and Remdesivir. And He is Lord over the actions and inactions of every man, woman, and child. No, God does not make men sin, but He can and does permit or stop any action at any time that does not accord with His purpose of glorifying Himself and blessing His church.

            The writers of the New Testament were as adamant about the reality of this truth as the writers of the Old Testament were faithful to record examples of God’s providence. Paul gives us this unequivocal declaration: “And we know that God causes all things to work together for good to those who love God, to those who are called according to His purpose” (Rom. 8:28). We know, he affirms, that God is at work making all things—not many, not even most, but all—work together for those who love God. It might also be said that God orders all things in the lives of sinners, too, but not for their ultimate good.

            You and I will never lead the lives the Lord wants us to live until we recognize, rest, and rejoice in the daily providential care with which the Lord governs our lives. It is not foolish, childish, or superstitious to see God’s hand behind the sting of a hornet or the butterfly’s pollination of a flower, the timely arrival or withholding of rain, the safe drive across town or the fall off a stepladder. God wants us to live that kind of life. Are you?

Actions: E-mail | Permalink

Previous Page | Next Page